Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University

Past Events

December

Tuesday, December 18, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Friday, December 14, 8 p.m.
St. Luke and the Epiphany (330 S. 13th Street)

At the 42nd Annual Holiday Concert, the Thomas Jefferson University Choir and Orchestra present:
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Missa Longa, Carols of the Season and Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus." The concert is free and no registration is required

Conductor: Robert Thayer Sataloff, M.D., D.M.A
Associate Conductors: Margaret M. Baroody, M.M. and Michael Mahla, M.D.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Thursday, December 13, 6 p.m., JAH 207

Come join QuIPS/IHI (Quality Improvement & Patient Safety/Institute for Healthcare Improvement) and the Gibbon Surgical Society for a screening of Transparent Health’s “The Faces of Medical Errors, from Tears to Transparency: the Story of Lewis Blackman.” The film tells the story of how gaps in proper informed consent led to devastating medical errors. Following the film screening will be a discussion moderated by Jefferson surgery resident Courtney Devin, who is currently on her research year and is interested in QI/patient safety and pediatric surgery. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self-Care: Transforming Mental and Emotional States
Monday, December 10, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Learn more HERE.

When life gets stressful and the pressures of school, work and home life are piling up, it’s easy to get stuck in negative emotions and self-defeating thoughts. This workshop will utilize art and music to break up mental and emotional stuck points and introduce new ways of rejuvenating our spirits.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Wednesday, December 5, 12-1 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

This event is open to the public. Register here

Alan Lightman, who worked for many years as a theoretical physicist, is the author of six novels, including the international best seller Einstein’s Dreams, as well as The Diagnosis, a finalist for the National Book Award. In 2018, he published two new books: Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine, about science, religion, and their different ways of knowing the world, and In Praise of Wasting Time. He is also the founder of the Harpswell Foundation, an organization devoted to the advancement of women in Southeast Asia.

After serving on the faculty of Harvard for a dozen years, Lightman moved to MIT, where he became the first person to receive a dual faculty appointment in the sciences and the humanities. His short story, “The Second Law of Thermodynamics,” was the first fiction published by the physics journal Physics Today, and his essay “In the Name of Love” was the first essay on that subject in the prestigious international science journal Nature. Elsewhere, his essays on science and the human condition have been published in The Atlantic, Harper’s, The New Yorker, Tin House, The New York Times, and many other places. Check out his articles in Nautilus and Harper's Magazine.

In astrophysics, Lightman has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of black holes, radiation processes at the centers of galaxies, and the foundations of Einstein’s theory of gravity. He is a past chair of the high-energy division of the American Astronomical Society and an elected fellow of the American Physical Society as well as the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. At MIT, he has been the John Burchard Professor of Humanities and Senior Lecturer in Physics and is currently Professor of the Practice of the Humanities.

Lunch provided; first come, first served.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

November

Wednesday, November 28, 12-1 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Topic: Holiday Leftovers and Other Reasons I'm Grateful

The Schwartz Rounds program is an international initiative that offers healthcare providers a regularly scheduled time to discuss the social and emotional issues they face in caring for patients and families. Every 4th Wednesday of the month, the Jefferson community has an opportunity to share their experiences, thoughts and feelings on thought-provoking topics drawn from actual patient case. By discussing these issues openly and honestly, future and current caregivers will be better able to make personal connections with patients and colleagues because they have greater insight into their own responses and feelings. Learn more about Schwartz Rounds HERE.

Lunch provided. Open to the Jefferson community. No registration required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, November 27, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge
Philadelphia Brass: BACH, BERNSTEIN and BRASS

Hailed by music critics and audiences alike, the award-winning Philadelphia Brass continues their 30th Anniversary season with music from J.S. Bach, Leonard Bernstein and Philadelphia’s own Kile Smith. Plus, no Philadelphia Brass performance would be complete without their trademark set of jazz standards to bring the concert to a rousing close!

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, November 20, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: From Self-Criticism to Self-Compassion
Monday, November 19, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration is available HERE.

We all have inner critics that compare how we are with how we think we should be. While this tendency to judge and evaluate ourselves can be a source of motivation, it can also undermine our sense of self-worth and make us feel “not good enough” in many areas of our lives. This workshop will focus on how to shift from viewing ourselves through a lens of criticism to a lens of compassion. We will utilize writing and music to challenge perfectionism and promote self-acceptance.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event

Friday, November 16, 3-9 p.m., Foerderer Auditorium, College Building

Open to all Jefferson students. Pre-registration is required HERE.

Have you considered getting involved with global health as part of your career? Come gain hands-on problem-solving experience through interactive small-group workshops co-led and developed by internationally renowned global health leaders and students across schools.

Topics will highlight innovations and problem areas in the global practice of:

  • Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation
  • Disaster Relief Preparedness
  • Female, Maternal and Fetal Health
  • General Surgery
  • Addiction and Behavioral Health
  • Epidemic / Pandemic Management
  • Neurosurgery, Trauma and Emergency Care
  • Global Local Interventions

Dinner is provided. Followed by a Post-Conference Networking event from 9-10:30 p.m.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Thursday, November 15, 1-4 p.m., Hamilton 1st Floor

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, November 13, 6-7:30 p.m., Connelly Auditorium

A special panel presentation to share the experiences and perspectives of veterans as well as highlight the importance of incorporating their unique healthcare needs into medical education. Focused on the health and well-being of veterans, both within and beyond the hospital walls, the panel is open to students, faculty, and staff from every college and department.

Sponsored by the Veterans Health Initiative and Military Medical Student Association.

No registration required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Tuesday, November 13, 6:30-7:30, JAH 207

Join Jefferson's Institute for Healthcare Improvement Chapter and Chief Surgical Resident Dr. Adam Johnson for a film screening and discussion of "From Tears to Transparency: The Lewis Blackman Story." The film tells the story of how gaps in proper informed consent led to devastating medical errors. We'll discuss the importance of informed consent, how it relates to quality improvement and patient safety, and ways students, residents, and physicians can improve communication skills and work towards delivering safer healthcare.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Medicine in Modern Life
Play reading: The Effect by Lucy Prebble
Monday, November 12, 7 p.m., Drake Theatres (302 South Hicks St.)

Inis Nua’s 2018-2019 Reading Series takes a look at how medical and scientific advances have shaped our lives. Exploring how we are affected by the illnesses we suffer, the treatment we receive, and the motivations of those who treat us, three very different stories show the problems created by some of the solutions of science and medicine.

This theme is echoed in The Effect, a play by Lucy Prebble: “When Connie and Tristan meet on a paid overnight drug trial, the chemistry isn’t immediate. But when a romance starts to develop under these strange conditions, it’s hard to tell what is a genuine emotion and what is just a side effect.”

No registration required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Walk in My Shoes: Philadelphia Police Officers and People in Communities of Color Share Their Personal Stories
Friday, November 9, Eakins Lounge

This event is free and open to the Jefferson community and the public. Tickets are limited and pre-registration is required HERE.

What are the healing stories that we need to hear now? Come to the first public screening of the Theater of Witness film Walk in My Shoes based on the production created and performed by Philadelphia police and people in communities of color. The original performance is based on the performers’ true stories of how historical racism, poverty, trauma, inequality, safety, injustice and heroism intersect in the lives of both police and community members. Performed by the people themselves, this provocative film moves the heart as well as the mind. Watch the trailer for Walk in My Shoes

Following the film, producers Police Inspector Altovise Love-Craighead and Artistic Director Teya Sepinuck, as well as the performers, will speak about the deep connections they made as they listened and created this historic production together.

About Theater of Witness: 
Theater of Witness brings people together across divides of difference to bear witness to the beauty of meaningful engagement, cultivate empathy and truly listen to the stories of people we’ve never heard before. Without shying away from the painful wounds of our society, Theater of Witness offers a new story. One that taps into the spirit of love and connection between us all.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

The Politics of Health: A conversation with Jonathan Metzl and others about the social and political construction of "health"
Thursday, November 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Slought (4017 Walnut St.)

Open to the public. Learn more HERE.

Slought and the Health Ecologies Lab are pleased to announce The Politics of Health, a conversation with Jonathan Metzl and others about the social and political construction of "health." Metzl writes at the intersection of psychiatry, the history and sociology of science, and contemporary politics. In books such as The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease (2010) and Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality (2010), Metzl offers fundamental insights into the way in which healthcare exacerbates disparities. His forthcoming book, Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment Is Killing America's Heartland (2019), analyzes the health effects of white supremacy in the era of Trump. This event, which will take place two days after the US midterm elections, will also engage the results of the election and strategies going forward.

Dying of Whiteness (2019) analyzes the consequences of right-wing backlash policies under Donald Trump's pledge to make American lives great again. Through a series of interviews, Metzl examines the impact of racial resentment on public policy, gun laws, the Affordable Care Act, schools and social services. Not only does he reveal the ties between policy and racial resentment, he also unveils the costs of these policies, including increasing deaths by gun suicide, falling life expectancies, and rising dropout rates. Metzl argues that Trump's policies, while promising to change lives for the better, are in reality fueled by racial hierarchies which profoundly undermine the health of America's Heartland. Join us for this timely conversation about Dying of Whiteness and Metzl's longstanding engagement with the politics of health.

This event is co-presented with Jefferson Humanities & Health and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, and is the first of two events featuring sustained conversations with Metzl. The conversation with Metzl at Slought will be moderated by Michelle Munyikwa, an MD/PhD Student in Anthropology, and Aaron Levy, Senior Lecturer in English and History of Art, University of Pennsylvania.

Wednesday, November 7, 5-7:30 p.m., JAH Brent Auditorium

All attendees must be registered for the Leadership LIVE program. 

The current political climate has individuals paying special attention to issues that affect individuals at personal, national, and global levels. Featuring Amanda Owens, the Executive Director of the Justice Bell Foundation, this program will examine gender inequality and what it means for all of us, particularly as future healthcare and industry leaders. Participants will be asked to engage in introspection on their current perceptions and knowledge of the landscape of equal rights.

This interactive discussion will be followed by a screening of the documentary film Equal Means Equal, which presents “an unflinching look at how women are treated in the United States today. Examining both real-life stories and precedent-setting legal cases, director Kamala Lopez uncovers how outdated and discriminatory attitudes inform and influence seemingly disparate issues…”  Following the film, participants will be asked to consider their reaction to what they saw, reflect on how their perspective may have changed, and discuss how they can become further engaged.  

*Students may earn dual credit for both the Leadership LIVE certificate and the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

October

Tuesday, October 30, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton Lobby 
Jack St. Clair Orchestra: Diagnosis? Swing!!

The Jack Saint Clair Orchestra is a collection of 17 outstanding Philadelphia musicians dedicated to keeping the flame of big band music alive in our city. Performing from an eclectic library of Saint Clair's arrangements, the orchestra blasts with joy, camaraderie, and the spontaneous fun of jazz

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, October 29, 5-6:30 p.m.
JAH Atrium

Refreshments will be served prior to the Story Slam from 4:30-5 p.m. Free and open to all Jefferson students, faculty and staff. RSVP appreciated, but not required.

Join us for the second annual Resilience Story Slam! Jefferson clinicians share stories that address the critical balance for health professionals between the profound meaning and joy that come with providing care and the necessity for resilience in response to the stresses of caregiving. Story Slams involve a series of speakers presenting five-minute stories that revolve around a particular theme. This interdisciplinary event will showcase perspectives from a variety of health professions.

Featuring:

  • Karen Alexander, PhD, RN, Jefferson College of Nursing
  • Rachel Brandoff, PhD, ATR-BC, ATCS, LCAT, Jefferson College of Health Professions, Community and Trauma Counseling
  • Rebecca Brown, OTS, and Cerissa Zenor Clark, OTS, Jefferson College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Occupational Therapy
  • Rosemary (Rosie) Frasso, PhD, CPH, Jefferson College of Population Health
  • Barbara Hackley, CNM, PhD, Jefferson College of Health Professions, Midwifery and Women’s Health
  • Amber E. King, PharmD, BCPS, Jefferson College of Pharmacy
  • Adesola Oje, MS4, Sidney Kimmel Medical College
  • John M. Spandorfer, MD, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Organized by SKMC Wellness, Jefferson Humanities & Health and the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education

This Story Slam counts for 5 Employee Wellness Points; under “Lunch and Learn,” select “Story Slam.”

Questions? Contact Stephanie Battistone, Undergraduate Medical Education Coordinator, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Stephanie.Battistone@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Sunday, October 28, 1:30 p.m.
Meet at Ratchada Thai Restaurant (1117 S. 11th St.)

The tour and all food is free for Jefferson students, but tickets are limited and pre-registration required. Registration is available HERE

Join fellow Jefferson students for a private food tour of South Philadelphia's Asian cuisine! Mention the words “South Philly” and almost everyone immediately pictures the Italian Market. Yet, nestled in and around the market is outstanding Asian cuisine. On this tour, we'll get a taste of various cultures and culinary traditions. As a special treat, this is the only tour in Philadelphia that is granted access to a Buddhist temple.

Philly's Asian Cuisine tour will visit:

  • A Thai restaurant to sample three delicious Thai appetizers in the lavishly decorated dining room.
  • A Vietnamese restaurant to enjoy a scrumptious and exquisitely made roasted pork Banh Mi (Vietnamese hoagie).
  • One of the area's best Indian restaurants to enjoy two fantastic appetizers and a delicious dessert.
  • A Buddhist temple to see its elaborate and ornate interior. There, we'll share some fascinating facts about the symbolism and meaning of ceremonial items. This is a rare opportunity you won't want to miss.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, October 22, 5-8 p.m., BLSB 107

Open to all Jefferson students. No registration required.

QUEST "is the moving documentary portrait of the Rainey family living in North Philadelphia. Beginning at the dawn of the Obama presidency, Christopher “Quest” Rainey and his wife, Christine’a “Ma Quest,” raise a family while nurturing a community of hip hop artists in their home music studio. It's a safe space where all are welcome, but this creative sanctuary can’t always shield them from the strife that grips their neighborhood. Epic in scope, QUEST is a vivid illumination of race and class in America, and a testament to love, healing and hope." Learn More.

After the screening, we will have a short discussion about the media's role in constructing narratives of families in disenfranchised neighborhoods. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

14th Soul of Medicine Brunch: Preparing to Serve Over a Lifetime, Protecting Yourself as You Bear Witness
Sunday, October 21, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., College of Physicians, 19 S. 22nd Street

Free for Jefferson students. Learn more HERE.

Medical students and seasoned clinicians will share stories that have inspired and challenged them. We will discuss strategies that allow us to serve others with integrity, absolute respect and unconditional positive regard while avoiding burnout and compassion fatigue.

Keynote speaker: Ken Ginsberg. Dr Ginsburg specializes in Adolescent Medicine at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and is The Health Services Director at Covenant House Pennsylvania, where he serves homeless, trafficked, and marginalized youth. 

Sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility Philadelphia.

Friday, October 19, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 505

This event is free and open to the public. Learn more HERE

Anne Basting is a theater artist and educator demonstrating the potential of storytelling and creative expression to improve the lives of elders experiencing cognitive impairment. Across a variety of platforms, including collaborative public performance and academic research, Basting has developed an alternative concept of aging that focuses on its possibilities as well as its challenges. Basting is Professor of Theater in the Peck School of the Arts at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, founder and president of TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, and a 2016 MacArthur Fellow.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Thursday, October 18, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Hamilton 505

Presented by the Graduate Student Association and Jefferson Humanities & Health

Maiken Scott, host of WHYY's The Pulse, will kickstart GSA's Science Outreach and Communication initiative with this seminar-style event. She will share her experience as a radio host and science communicator and explain how she thinks about the challenging work of communicating scientific research to the public. 

Refreshments will be provided.

For more information, email tess.cherlin@jefferson.edu

Thursday, October 18, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Balancing Work and Life
Monday, October 15, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Learn more HERE

Juggling school along with other life commitments is a challenge that can leave us feeling stressed and pulled in different directions. In this art and movement-based workshop, we will practice exercises that promote an awareness of what balance actually feels and looks like. We will explore setting boundaries, how to prevent burnout, and how to recognize, listen to and meet our own needs.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Saturday, October 13, 8 p.m.
Zellerbach Theatre, Annenberg Center

Free for Jefferson students, but pre-registration required. Learn more HERE.

Nearly 50 years ago, two towering public figures, African-American author James Baldwin and white anthropologist Margaret Mead, sat together and recorded an epic and intimate seven-and-a-half-hour conversation about race in America. Now, choreographer Donald Byrd and playwright Anna Deavere Smith re-imagine that conversation in the present in A Rap on Race. This new dance-theatre work combines text with movement and music to communicate the complexities of talking about race, at a time when that conversation is as necessary as ever.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, October 9, 10am-1pm
Kanbar Performance Space, East Falls campus (4201 Henry Avenue)

This event is free and open to the Jefferson community and the public. Learn more HERE.

Design Philadelphia will feature Jefferson's Art Therapy Specialization program during its annual festival this fall. Through this hands-on workshop, participants will learn about art therapy as a dynamic approach to mental health, counseling and healing. Participants will create while learning about the use of art in psychotherapy as a tool for physical and emotional release, personal development and growth, insight, trauma processing, skill building and enhancing communication.
Participants don't need any prior art experience or proficiency to appreciate this workshop. Art therapy is founded on the principles that art is inherently healing and life-enhancing and that all people have the capacity for growth, change, and creative expression.

September

Saturday, September 29, 1:30 p.m., Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, 300 South Broad Street

Tickets are free for Jefferson students, but seats are limited and pre-registration is required. Learn more HERE.

Is there any grace in forgetting? Don’t miss the next new work brought to life at Opera Philadelphia, one of “the most creative and ambitious companies in this country” (The New York Times). This new chamber opera finds fleeting beauty in memory loss through an unflinching yet uplifting exploration of living with Alzheimer’s disease. Frederica von Stade and Marietta Simpson embody this fantastical world premiere from composer Lembit Beecher and librettist Hannah Moscovitch. (Opera Philadelphia)

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Coping With Stress

Monday, September 24, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration is available HERE

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

This writing and movement based workshop will focus on coping with stress. Learn how to identify the physical and emotional symptoms of stress, as well as how to move through them to a more grounded and relaxed state.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Sunday, September 23, 5-7 p.m., Martin Hall Basement Lounge

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty and staff.

Do you have a loved one or family member who is living with dementia? Would you like to connect with others for conversation and support? HeART Stories is hosting a "Talking about Dementia" dinner open to the Jefferson community. We will provide dinner, beverages and prompts to get the conversation going. You bring yourself. Facilitated by Teya Sepinuck, Theater of Witness Artistic Director, and Susan Shifrin, ARTZ Philadelphia Executive Director. 

RSVP to Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, September 17-Saturday, September 22, Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust Street, 4th Floor lobby

Willie Baronet is an award-winning graphic designer and Stan Richards Professor in Creative Advertising at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts. Since 1993, Baronet has been buying and collecting signs from people soliciting support on the street, in response to his own discomfort witnessing poverty. In 2014, Baronet and three filmmakers drove across the U.S., interviewing more than 100 people on the streets and purchasing over 280 signs while producing the documentary film, Signs of Humanity. In July 2018, Baronet completed a residency in Philadelphia, collecting signs and interviews with JCPH associate professor Rosemary Frasso. The exhibition Signs of Humanity includes signs from Philadelphia.

To learn more about Willie Baronet and his work, see his website: http://www.weareallhomeless.org/

Thursday, September 20, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust Street, 4th Floor lobby

This event is open to the public. Registration is appreciated, but not required. Learn More.

Join us for a reception celebrating the exhibition Signs of Humanity, featuring a panel discussion with artist Willie Baronet and JCPH associate professor Rosemary Frasso.

Willie Baronet is an award-winning graphic designer and Stan Richards Professor in Creative Advertising at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts. Since 1993, Baronet has been buying and collecting signs from people soliciting support on the street, in response to his own discomfort witnessing poverty. In 2014, Baronet and three filmmakers drove across the U.S., interviewing more than 100 people on the streets and purchasing over 280 signs while producing the documentary film, Signs of Humanity. In July 2018, Baronet completed a residency in Philadelphia, collecting signs and interviews with JCPH associate professor Rosemary Frasso. The exhibition Signs of Humanity includes signs from Philadelphia as well as signs previously collected by Baronet.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Wednesday, September 19, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust Street, Room 505
Signs of Humanity (2016, dir. Willie Baronet and Tim Chumley, 63 min.)

Willie Baronet is an award-winning graphic designer and Stan Richards Professor in Creative Advertising at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts. Since 1993, Baronet has been buying and collecting signs from people soliciting support on the street, in response to his own discomfort witnessing poverty. In 2014, Baronet and three filmmakers drove across the U.S., interviewing more than 100 people on the streets and purchasing over 280 signs while producing the documentary film, Signs of Humanity. Lunch provided; first-come, first-served.

Learn more about the documentary and find clips here: http://signsofhumanity.org/

Not able to join us? Members of the Jefferson community can access the film to watch at their convenience using Panopto HERE.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, September 17, 6 p.m., DEC Forum, East Falls Campus

The College of Architecture and the Built Environment's Fall 2018 Lecture Series continues on September 17 with Majora Carter.

Majora Carter is a leading urban revitalization strategy consultant, real estate developer, and Peabody Award winning broadcaster. She is responsible for the creation & implementation of numerous green-infrastructure projects, policies, and job training & placement systems. She has helped connect tech industry pioneers such as Etsy, Gust, FreshDirect, Google, and Cisco to diverse communities at all levels, and she continues to drive resources that value diversity into the communities left out of previ­ous economic growth trends. 

Saturday, September 15, 7 p.m.
Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, 300 South Broad Street

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available starting August 10 HERE.

The Philadelphia Orchestra celebrates ten years of music-making under the baton of conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin. The concert features Grieg’s Piano Concerto performed by André Watts, Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances, and the world premiere of the orchestral suite for Nico Muhly’s opera Marnie, based on the Alfred Hitchcock film. Tickets are free for Jefferson students with pre-registration and include a pre-concert talk by an Orchestra musician.

Friday, September 7, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
448 North 10th Street

Philadelphia’s Bearded Ladies Cabaret has some treats for you. Do You Want A Cookie? transforms an old factory to concoct the perfect cabaret confections to satisfy your cravings. Part Great Cabaret Bake-Off, part irreverent romp through cabaret history, the show is at once subversive, joyous, provocative, and communal.

An international cast of cabaret artists perform across two levels of a cavernous space refitted as a seductive nightclub, presenting a live history of cabaret from Le Chat Noir to Weimar nightlife to 21st-century drag. Do You Want A Cookie? sees the live culmination of a multi-year study by John Jarboe and Sally Ollove of cabaret’s history and evolution

About The Bearded Ladies Cabaret:
The Bearded Ladies Cabaret is an interdisciplinary troupe of artists who reinvigorate and redefine the form of cabaret in the 21st century by fusing it with theater, opera, and dance. They play with nostalgia and humor to question the embedded social messages in popular culture and tackle the politics of gender, identity, and artistic invention with sparkle and wit. Their work has been seen all over Philadelphia including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Eastern State Penitentiary, Opera Philadelphia, the Wilma Theater, and FringeArts and they have brought their cabaret revolution to Miami, New Zealand, Seattle, Paris, Maryland, Delaware and New York City (Ars Nova, La Mama, and Joe’s Pub).

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

August 2018

Mon., Aug. 27, 6 p.m., Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust St., Connelly Auditorium

College of Architecture and the Built Environment kicks off the 2018 Fall Lecture Series with Karim Rashid.

Visionary and prolific, Karim Rashid is one of the most unique voices in design today. With more than 4000 designs in production, nearly 300 awards to his name, and client work in over 40 countries, Karim's ability to transcend typology continues to make him a force among designers of his generation. Eschewing style in favor of designing in the modus of our time, Karim's designs include luxury goods for Christofle, Alessi, and Veuve Clicquot; democratic products for Umbra, bobble, and 3M; timeless furniture for Bonaldo, Tonelli, BoConcept, and Vandorn; exquisite lighting for Artemide and Fontana Arte; high-tech products for Asus and Sirinlabs; surface design for Marburg and Abet Laminati; iconic graphics for Citibank and Sony Ericsson; and award-winning packaging for Method, Paris Baguette, Kenzo, and Eos. 

2017-2018

Each academic year, the Dr. Yoshihisa Asano Humanities & Health Series explores a thought-provoking theme from a broad range of perspectives, inviting consideration and action around urgent issues impacting how we improve lives. Series programs promote understanding of the social contexts of health and wellness, the lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

During the 2017-2018 academic year, the Asano Humanities & Health Series investigated the theme Safety.

Throughout the year, series programs will explore dimensions of Safety, including:

  • Safety as a social privilege related to age, ability, gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation 
  • Inequities as causes of health vulnerabilities 
  • Burnout prevention for health professionals 
  • Creating safe spaces and supporting diversity of opinion 
  • Risk-taking in art, design and entrepreneurship 

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Connection With Self and Others
Monday, May 7, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

How Are We Free: Art Exhibition & Reception
Monday, April 2, 5:30 p.m., Scott Library room 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Anxiety Management
Monday, April 2, 5-7 p.m., JAH M24

Jefferson Night at the Orchestra: Philadelphia Voices
Saturday, April 7, 6:30 p.m., Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, Verizon Hall

Dean's Concert Series: WindSync
Tuesday, April 10, 12-1 p.m., JAH Eakins Lounge

"Mind Games:" A Unique Educational Event to Advance Relationship Violence and Abuse (RVA) Awareness
Sunday, April 15, 4 p.m., Kanbar Performance Space, East Falls Campus (4201 Henry Avenue)

NODA Presents: What Children Learn About Death from Film
Monday, April 16, 12-1 p.m., JAH 307

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mondays, 12-1 p.m., JAH M23 and Scott Library room 200A

HUMANITIES WEEK:

Confronting Racism, Bias, and Social Injustice in Healthcare Lecture Series: Dorothy Roberts
Tuesday, April 24, 12-1 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Philadelphia Gay Men's Chorus
Tuesday, April 24, 6 p.m., Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium

A Celebration of the Humanities
Thursday, April 26, 6-7:30 p.m., Hamilton Lobby

Fusion: Innovation Across Disciplines 
Friday, April 27, 10-2 p.m., Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium and Conrady Lobby

Transitioning Traditions: Expanding Art Therapy’s Reach
Saturday, March 10, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Jefferson East Falls, 4201 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19144

Dual Face | Dwimuka: Didik Nini Thowok
Sunday, March 11, 7 p.m.
International House Philadelphia, Ibrahim Theater (3701 Chestnut St.)

Film Screening & Discussion: Transparency & Physician-Patient Communication- The Story of Lewis Blackman 
Presented by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement - Jefferson Chapter
Tuesday, March 20, 7-8 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall room 207

Dean's Concert Series: Jefferson Chamber Orchestra
Tuesday, March 20, 12-1 p.m., JAH Eakins Lounge

Creative Arts Therapies Week: Exploring Identity Through Creativity
Thursday, March 22, 5-7 p.m., Scott Library room 200A

Creative Arts Therapies Week: Zentangle Workshop
Friday, March 23, 12-1:30pm, Hamilton 226

Creative Arts Therapies Week: Create Your Own Zen Garden
Friday, March 23, 3-4:30pm, 833 Chestnut Street, Suite 210-A, Room B-01

Equal Means Equal: Film Screening and Dinner
Tuesday, March 27, 5:30-8 p.m., JAH Atrium

An Evening with Nick Cave
Thursday, March 29, 7 p.m., Hamilton Building-Connelly Auditorium

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mondays, 12-1 p.m.
Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A and Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room M23

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson 
Mondays, 12-1 p.m.
Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A

Creative Approaches to Self-Care: Balance
Mon., Feb. 5, 5-7 p.m.
Hamilton 208/209 

Building Coalitions: Advocacy & Political Action as a Student (Leadership LIVE)
Mon., Feb. 5, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Diversity Council Journal Club
Wednesday, February 7, 12 p.m. 
BLSB 107

Mark Morris Dance Group: Dances to American Music 
Friday, February 9, 8-10 PM
Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, 3680 Walnut Street

Dean's Concert Series: Plucks & Hammers - A mélange of music for guitar and piano
February 27, 12-1 p.m.
JAH Eakins Lounge

Physician Executive Leadership presents Dr. David Fajgenbaum
February 28, 6:30 p.m.
Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Philadelphia Public Health Grand Rounds: Gun Violence in Philadelphia: Actions and Solutions
February 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, 19 S. 22nd Street

Health Ecologies Reading Group 
Monday, January 22, 12-1 p.m. 
Scott Memorial Library - 200A

International Holocaust Remembrance Day: 50 Children: One Ordinary American Couple's Extraordinary Rescue Mission in the Heart of Nazi Germany
Thursday, January 25, 12 p.m.
Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium (1001 Locust Street)

InterAct Theatre Company: Sensitive Guys
Sunday, January 28, 2 p.m.-4 p.m., InterAct Theatre Company (302 South Hicks St.) 

Health Ecologies Reading Group 
Monday, January 29, 12-1 p.m. 
Scott Memorial Library - 200A

Thrive: Trauma-Informed Practice in Community-Engaged Art
Sat., Dec. 2, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Dec. 4, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Journey Through Change
Mon., Dec. 4, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Dec. 11, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Dec. 18, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

StorySlam: Resilience in Healthcare
Thurs., Nov. 2, 5-6:30 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Atrium

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 6, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Developing Self-Compassion
Mon., Nov. 6, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

Roxane Gay: Hunger
Fri., Nov. 10, 7-8:30 p.m., Foerderer Auditorium, College Building

Theater of Witness: Walk In My Shoes
Sat., Nov. 11, 8 p.m., Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine Street

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 13, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Dean's Concert Series: Brian Ganz
Tuesday, Nov. 14, 12-1 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Eakins Lounge

Theater of Witness: The Heart and Soul of Story
Weds., Nov. 15, 7-8:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 20, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 27, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Reflective Leadership
Tues., Nov. 28, 5:30-6:30 p.m., JAH Brent Auditorium
Weds., Nov. 29, 12-1 p.m., JAH 407

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 2, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Mental Health/Transforming Emotional States
Mon., Oct. 2, 5-7 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall M23

Jefferson Night at The Philadelphia Orchestra: Season Kick-Off, Yannick & Emmanuel Ax
Sat., Oct. 7, private reception at 6:30 p.m., concert at 8 p.m., Verizon Hall, Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 9, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Dean's Concert Series: Klinefelter Trio
Tuesday, Oct. 10, 12-1 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Eakins Lounge

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 16, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Mural Arts Tour: Mural Mile and Monument Lab
Sat., Oct. 21, 12-2 p.m.; tour start: NW corner of 10th and Locust Streets, tour end: Rittenhouse Square

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 23, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Murder at the Mütter
Sun., Oct. 29, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Mütter Museum, 19 S. 22nd St., Philadelphia

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 30, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Exploring Resilience for Health Professionals: What We Know, and What We Can Do
Mon., Oct. 30, 5-6:30 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Atrium

Dean's Concert Series: The Franklin Quartet
Tuesday, Oct. 31, 12-1 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Eakins Lounge

Poetry Workshop with Philadelphia Poet Laureate Yolanda Wisher
Sat., Sept. 2, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Grounding
Mon., Sept. 11, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

The Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lecture: Damon Tweedy, MD
Tues., Sept. 12, 12 p.m., Herbut Auditorium, College Building
Tues., Sept. 12, 4 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Dorrance H. Hamilton Building

Caring for Communities: Practicing at the Intersection of Health + Art
Tues., Sept. 12, 6:30-8 p.m., Moore College of Art and Design, 1916 Race St. 

A Friend of a Friend Sent Me
Thurs., Sept. 14, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 10th Street between Chestnut and Market

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Sept. 18, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Opera Philadelphia: We Shall Not Be Moved
Mon., Sept. 18 & Thurs., Sept. 21, 8-10:30 p.m., Wilma Theater, 265 South Broad Street

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Sept. 25, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A