Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University

Publications

Highlighted Publications

Walsh PD, Kurup D, Hasselschwert DL, Wirblich C, Goetzmann JE, Schnell MJ. The Final (Oral Ebola) Vaccine Trial on Captive Chimpanzees? Sci Rep. 2017;7:43339. doi: 10.1038/srep43339. PubMed.

In this study, we showed that apes can be orally immunized against rabies virus and Ebola virus. Ebola virus is not only a killer of humans but also kills the endangered great apes and protection is urgently needed.


Johnson RF, Kurup D, Hagen KR, Fisher C, Keshwara R, Papaneri A, Perry DL, Cooper K, Jahrling PB, Wang JT, Ter Meulen J, Wirblich C, Schnell MJ. An Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Ebola Vaccine, FILORAB1, Adjuvanted With Glucopyranosyl Lipid A in Stable Emulsion Confers Complete Protection in Nonhuman Primate Challenge Models. The Journal of infectious diseases. 2016;214(suppl 3):S342-S54. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiw231. PubMed

This publication provides evidence that a deactivated rabies virus-based vaccine protects against Ebola virus in non-human primates. The deactivated vaccine is currently being further developed and will soon move in phase 1 clinical trials in humans.


Reardon TR, Murray AJ, Turi GF, Wirblich C, Croce KR, Schnell MJ, Jessell TM, Losonczy A. Rabies Virus CVS-N2c Strain Enhances Retrograde Synaptic Transfer and Neuronal Viability. Neuron. 2016.

Rabies virus naturally infects neurons and can therefore be manipulated into is an excellent tracing tool to analyze neuroanatomy and neuronal connections.


Pfaller CK, Cattaneo R, Schnell MJ. Reverse genetics of Mononegavirales: How they work, new vaccines, and new cancer therapeutics. Virology. 2015;479-480:331-44.

This publication provides a comprehensive overview of the use of mononegavirales virus-based viral vectors, a major interest of our laboratory.


Davis BD, Rall GF, Schnell MJ. Everything you always wanted to know about rabies virus (but were afraid to ask). In: Enquist D, DiMaio, editor. Annual Review of Virology. Palo Alto, California, USA: Annual Reviews; 2015. p. 51-71.

This article gives an overview of the rabies virus, the molecular virology of which is the foundational expertise of our lab.


Recent Publications

Retrograde axonal transport of rabies virus is unaffected by interferon treatment but blocked by emetine locally in axons

The spread and evolution of rabies virus: Conquering new frontiers

Ebola Virus Localization in the Macaque Reproductive Tract during Acute Ebola Virus Disease

Ifit2 is a restriction factor in rabies virus pathogenicity

Progress in Ebola Virus Vaccine Development

Inactivated recombinant rabies viruses displaying canine distemper virus glycoproteins induce protective immunity against both pathogens

The final (Oral Ebola) vaccine trial on captive chimpanzees?

Toward an Effective Ebola Virus Vaccine

One-Health: A safe, efficient, dual-use vaccine for humans and animals against middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus and rabies virus

Keeping it in check: Chronic viral infection and antiviral immunity in the brain

An Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Ebola Vaccine, FILORAB1, Adjuvanted with Glucopyranosyl Lipid A in Stable Emulsion Confers Complete Protection in Nonhuman Primate Challenge Models

Rabies Virus CVS-N2cδGStrain Enhances Retrograde Synaptic Transfer and Neuronal Viability

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Rabies Virus (But Were Afraid to Ask)

Human polyclonal antibodies produced through DNA vaccination of transchromosomal cattle provide mice with post-exposure protection against lethal zaire and Sudan ebolaviruses

Reverse genetics of Mononegavirales: How they work, new vaccines, and new cancer therapeutics

Rhabdovirus-based vaccine platforms against henipaviruses

Controlled viral glycoprotein expression as a safety feature in a bivalent rabies-ebola vaccine

Preclinical Development of Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Polyvalent Vaccine Against Rabies and Filoviruses

Safety and serological response to a matrix gene-deleted rabies virus-based vaccine vector in dogs

Recombinant rabies virus particles presenting botulinum neurotoxin antigens elicit a protective humoral response in vivo